Fueling the Body

Updated: Feb 28

Before COVID-19, most of us were always on the go. We stayed so busy that we didn’t take time to cook. Going to a fast-food restaurant drive through was just easier. The sugars and carbohydrates in fast food provide a short-term cure for hunger. A few hours later, you might get hungry again, eat again and gain weight. What it doesn't do is provide our bodies with densely nutritional foods. Vitamins and minerals in food are what our body uses as fuel to repair damaged cells.

Now popular nutritional articles are discussing functional foods. These are foods that are high and rich in nutrients for our body. Flaxseed, spinach, kale, avocados, and nuts are some foods that have many vitamins & trace minerals that our bodies use to heal itself. The challenge is making sure that we eat them.

As we drive around, we may enjoy driving around curves and pulling low level g's, especially if you’re riding a motorcycle. It’s a double-edged sword. We get stressed while driving. Paying attention to other people or defensive driving to prevent an accident is now necessary any time we get behind the wheel. Defensive driving takes a lot of focus which can cause stress, especially when you drive long distances often. I share my experiences with another traveler. When I drive for work, I always see people texting. My friend didn’t believe me. She was travelling for work as well. About a day later, she called me back. She was so funny. She couldn’t believe it! She saw a couple in their 70's driving down the road texting!

So, after a long-distance work trip, I like to do something extra special for my health. I could pick something from my relaxation menu. Instead, I prefer to treat myself to some seafood. I’m happy to say the recipe that I found is excellent. It didn’t need any modifications. I found this recipe on Cafe Delites or cafedelites.com.

I left out the white wine on purpose. White wine can raise blood sugar.


Prep Time: 5 min. Cook Time 5 min.

Total Time 10 min. Serves 2


Ingredients:

  • 2 tbsp olive oil

  • 4 tbsp butter 🧈 melted

  • 4-5 garlic 🧄 cloves minced

  • 1 1/4 lbs. shrimp 🍤 deveined & peeled

  • Salt 🧂 & pepper to taste

  • 1/2 tsp crushed red 🌶 pepper

  • 2 tbsp lemon 🍋 juice

  • 1/4 cup chopped parsley 🌿

  • 4 cups chopped arugula

Directions:


1.) Heat up 2 tablespoons of butter & olive oil in a large skillet.

2.) Add the garlic and sauté for 30 seconds to 1 minute, until brown.

3.) Add the shrimp and season with salt & pepper, until the shrimp barely starts to turn pink.

4.) Toss in the red pepper flakes and cook for 1-2 minutes. Don’t overcook the shrimp.

5.) Stir in the remaining butter, lemon juice, and parsley.

6.) Chop up arugula, plate the greens, and top with scampi.


Shrimp in limited quantities is fine, just stay away from farm raised. Wild caught shrimp is better. This food is high in protein and has phosphorus, copper, zinc, magnesium, calcium, potassium, iron, and manganese. The high protein content and no carbohydrates makes this meat a great food for weight loss and healthy diabetics meals. The antioxidants in shrimp help repair the body. Astaxanthin is an antioxidant that helps prevent wrinkles. The large amounts of selenium in shrimp may help prevent certain types of cancer. It is an excellent fuel for the body.


Source: "Health Benefits of Shrimp"

WebMD 07/14/2019

Now I’m headed back out to the garden again. I’m enjoying the kale and sage flowering in my herb garden (pictured on the left and right). Let me know if you have tried this week's recipe. Please comment, like, share, and come back next week for more recipes, ideas, and tips. Subscribe to the website, if you would like weekly email reminders to add more recipes to your recipe book.


#HealthWorxInfo #diabetes #GardeningDiabetic #TravelingDiabetics #FoodIsMedicine🍎🥦🥕


Disclaimer: This is not medical advice, but a compilation of research from medical sites. Make sure to see your doctor and have up-to-date lab work.

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