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Frustrating Assumptions with Good Intentions

I used to travel a lot for work doing portrait photography. I really like to stay at Airbnb's. They were cleaner. They always had a really good refrigerator for my insulin. I used to always look around and see if I could figure out who owned each Airbnb. I talked to a few people I saw and realized they just did property management. Now being on the other side of the coin, doing that property management, I realize it’s easy to make assumptions.

Going to three different cities every week is extremely tiring. After six years of being a photographer, high gas prices and COVID19, I decided to change. I also needed the time to go see doctors and check up on my health,

The more you go see the doctor, the more often you hear the same thing. They ask you what your A1c is. You tell them. If it’s high, they always go through all the same old suggestions. This does get old. Instead of asking why do you think your blood sugar is high, the doctors start to tell you. Eat better and exercise more. Duh.

What if you are exercising and eating decently? Maybe you’re experimenting. You may be trying to lower your medication. You may have just had surgery. There’s also stress and the heat that gets to your body.

Instead of getting frustrated, we have to realize there is good intent. The presentation may be aggravating. We have to help people learn how to discuss diabetes. It is well worth it...

Everyone loves to tell you what you can and cannot eat. To those brave souls, I say be careful! Food choices are very personal and unique to each person's taste buds. This may have the opposite effect to make that diabetic crave that food just with the thought of not being able to have it. It may shut down conversation and prevent you from being able to help a loved one.

Friends and family love you. These comments come from the intention of keeping you healthy and around longer. Unfortunately, these comments are repetitive. When this happens ask them what you should be eating instead. Please do this in a non-snarky way. Be ready to start a conversation, not a lecture. This way you’re enlisting some help. My friends and family have come up with some great diabetic recipes!

For medical professionals, it is a bit tougher. Unless they're diabetic or an endocrinologist, many have much more to learn about diabetes. Nutritionists and dietitians are similar. Unless they specialize in diabetes, they may not understand. So be gentle with them. It's a great way to have an educational discussion about nutrition for both of you. Ask them to ask questions instead of making assumptions. For a doctor discussing a high A1c, start with a question, “What do you think is causing your A1c to be this number?”

This week's recipe should help refuel your body and not blow up your blood sugar. It has very healthy ingredients. You do need to watch the number of carrot chips due to their starch content. Starches found in root vegetables increase blood sugar. The fat from the avocados helps off set starch and slows the sugar's absorption into the blood stream.


Guacamole 🥑 & Carrots



Ingredients:

  • 3 avocados peeled, pitted, & mashed

  • 2 tablespoons of lime juice

  • 1 teaspoon salt

  • 1/2 cup diced onion

  • 3 tablespoons freshly chopped cilantro

  • 1 tomato diced

  • 1 teaspoon minced garlic

  • 1 pinch cayenne pepper (optional)

Directions:

  1. Mash up the avocados with salt and lime juice.

  2. Add the onion, cilantro, tomato, garlic, and cayenne pepper. Mix well.

  3. Refrigerate for one hour or more to blend the flavors.

Many people struggle using avocados. Picking an avocado that is ripe and ready to use is difficult. I look for a dark green fruit that feels soft without being mushy. I make sure each one still has the eye in it. Then I use it that same day. They are worth the challenge of finding just the right ones. Avocados have amazing benefits for our health! They are:

  1. Full of nutrients including vitamins C, K, & E as well as magnesium and potassium to name a few...

  2. Full of fiber, over half a day's requirement, that improves gut health.

  3. May aid in heart health by increasing the good, HDL. cholesterol in the body and reduce the bad, LDL, cholesterol th

  4. Has over one half of the body's daily requirement of fiber that improves gut health.

  5. May improve heart health by increasing good, HDL, cholesterol while lowering bad, LDL, cholesterol that causes plaque buildup in the arteries.

  6. Is full of anti-inflammatory and antioxidants that may reduce your risk of chronic disease and improve cognitive function.

  7. High in fat which aids in feeling full, reducing the urge to snack and leading to weight loss.

  8. An excellent food choice during pregnancy and breast feeding due to its high folate, vitamin C, and potassium content.

  9. Versatile for use in many recipes.


Source: "7 Benefits of Eating Avocados"

Healthline 06/29/2022


Each diabetic is unique with different reactions to different foods. This is frustrating for each diabetic and one reason why some people can reverse their diabetes and others can't. I love my family, friends, and doctors for wanting to find a cure. One day we will, so keep educating the people in your life that are interested in learning. Realize more will be on board in the future. Meanwhile, all the assumptions come with a healing intention.

If you have a favorite dish, please tell me. I'll create a diabetic friendly version, just let me know by leaving a note below. I've learned how to swap blood sugar spiking ingredients for others with a lower glycemic index. It may take a week or two, but I love the challenge. Please comment, like, share, and come back next week for more recipes, ideas, and tips. Subscribe to the website, if you would like weekly email reminders to add more recipes to your recipe book.


#HealthWorxInfo #diabetes #GardeningDiabetic #TravelingDiabetics #FoodIsMedicine🍎🥦🥕


Disclaimer: This is not medical advice, but a compilation of research from medical sites. Make sure to see your doctor and have up-to-date lab work